Wednesday, February 19, 2014

THE PA MELTING POT - Part 2 - Great Britain - Part 2 - Scottish and Scotch-Irish (Ulster Scots)

NOTE:  JUST LEARNED SOMETHING THIS MORNING (2/20/2014) FROM FOODGRAPHY ON TV.  THE SCOT AND SCOTCH-IRISH INVENTED BOURBON IN THE US.  ERGO, THEN THE MINT JULIP AT THE KENTUCKY DERBY!!

This is the column I wrote for the Uniontown Helrald-Standard which will appear in the newspaper on 2/20/2014.

The Melting Pot:  A look at the evolution of food in southwestern Pa.  Part 2 Great Britain – Scottish and Scotch Irish
23 % of western Pennsylvania’s population is made up of Irish, Scotch-Irish and Scottish. 

(NOTE: See this blog for Irish post OR CLICK ON THIS LINK:  http://thepameltingpot.blogspot.com/2013/09/irish.html)

Today I would like to talk about the two immigrant groups from the Scotland/Ireland area:  
(1) Scots/Scotsman/Scottish/Scottish (which refers to anyone whose heritage lies within the borders of Scotland which throughout history are a combination of Angles, Saxons, Norse, French, English, Britons, Gaelic, Celts etc.) and 
(2) Scotch-Irish/Scots-Irish/ Scot-Irish/Ulster Scots (which refers to the Ulster Scots, an ethnic group in Ulster, Ireland, who trace their roots to settlers from Scotland and northern England) The term “Scotch-Irish” was coined in the United States when they immigrated in the 18th century). The number of Americans of Scottish descent today is estimated to be 20 to 25 million (up to 8.3% of the total US population), and Scotch-Irish, 27 to 30 million (up to 10% of the total US population).
The (Highland) Scottish (Johnny Cash and Andrew Carnegie were Scottish) have been stereotyped as being thrifty, cautious, and “careful of detail”. They were Catholic/Episcopalian, members of clans, spoke Gaelic, wore kilts, played bagpipes and still claim the Loch Ness monster!! Scottish festivals are big and the Ligonier Highland Games in September draw 5000-10,000 attendees. Scotch Bottom (Hazelwood and Greenfield) in Pittsburgh was settled by the Scottish.

SCOTTISH FOODS:  

Cock-a-leekie soup (leeks, chicken stock and barley), Scotch broth (barley, lamb, mutton or beef, carrots, turnips, split peas, lentils, cabbage and leeks), and Finnan Haddie which is cold smoked haddock. Black, red and white pudding (sausages), boiled Mutton or Lamb, Haggis (soup made with sheep parts), beef, venison and grouse.  Rumbledethumps (a vegetable dish) is made with potatoes, cabbage and onion. Crowdie (cream cheese) and Dunlop (soft cheddar) are popular cheeses. 

The Scots also enjoy rich vegetable soups, seafood in many forms, beef, oatcakes (a tasty biscuit), and short-bread (a rich, cookie-like confection), Burnt cream (crème brulee), Cranachan (whipped cream, whiskey, heather honey and fresh raspberries with toasted oatmeal), ales, drambuie, ginger wine and Scotch whiskey.


The Scotch-Irish (John Wayne and Thomas Mellon were Scotch-Irish) before 1900 over 1,200,000 immigrated from Ulster and a large number settled in industrial areas such as Pennsylvania (specifically western Pennsylvania).  They spoke Celtic, were Presbyterian, landowners, skilled workers, hard-working, and patriotic. They were responsible for breaking away from Virginia to form West Virginia. The language of the early Scots-Irish settlers had the greatest influence on the speech of southwestern/western Pennsylvania and also contributed to “Pittsburghese.”  The Scotch-Irish dialect region spans from western Pennsylvania to Erie (north), west to Youngstown, south to Clarksburg and east to Harrisburg.

SCOTCH-IRISH FOODS (a mixture of Scotch and Irish Foods):  Corned Beef and Cabbage, Fish and Chips (hand cut fries) with Malt Vinegar, Green Peas (sometimes called mushy peas), Colcannon (Mashed Potatoes, Turnips and Carrots pan cooked with butter), Irish Soda Bread and Scottish Fruit Scones. Also they use Irish cheeses and butter.  Guinness Lamb Stew, steak and potato pie, smoked Mackerel, Boxty (Irish Potato Pancakes), Scots Irish Stew, Scotch-Irish Potato Salad, Oatmeal Brulee, Barley wine, Irish Treacle Pudding, Barmbrack (currant cake), Goody (dessert with bread, milk, sugar and spices), whisky, Irish coffee, Mead, Irish breakfast tea and  lemonade.

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN LEARNING SCOTCH-IRISH OR ULSTER SCOT LANGUAGE LOOK AT THE LINK AT THE BOTTOM.  I WILL BE POSTING 14 LESSONS PERIODICALLY FROM THE BBT ON THIS SITE.  FIRST LINK HAS BEEN POSTED.  SEE BOTTOM OF PAGE. 


SCOTTISH AND SCOTTISH FOOD PHOTOS AND RECIPE 
LINKS BELOW THE PHOTOS

THEN NEXT SCOTCH-IRISH AND ULSTER PHOTOS AND RECIPE LINKS NEXT BELOW THE PHOTOS

SCOTTISH PHOTOS, FOOD PHOTOS AND RECIPE LINKS FIRST

Scotland
  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

    


Scottish Food Photos

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Scottish Food Links







SCOTCH-IRISH PHOTOS, FOOD PHOTOS AND RECIPE LINKS SECOND

Ulster Photos (Scotch-Irish)

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Scotch-Irish Food Photos

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

Scotch-Irish Food Links







Other Links and Videos

LINK TO EDINBURGH FESTIVALS

LINK TO EDINBURGH FESTIVAL VIDEOS

BBC's Lesson One - Scotch-Irish or Ulster Scot Language