Monday, August 19, 2013

The PA Melting Pot - Part 1 - Germany - German Sects 1

If you missed the Introduction to this series please click on this link:

The PA Melting Pot - Introduction

*****Also DON'T MISS the LINK  (IN RED)
to Cooking for Real -  Sunny prepares German food. 
Title of link is "Germany is Wonder-Veal"
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*****Also DON'T MISS the LINK to ALLRECIPES 282 German Recipes (IN PURPLE)
below Sunny's Link!
Title of Link is "All Recipes Link to 282 German Recipes"
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Now to Part 1 - 1 - German sects 

(NOTE:  Pennsylvania and California have the largest German population of the United States)
(NOTE 2:  17% OF American population is of German ancestry)
(NOTE 3:  50,000,000 of Americans state they are of German ancestry)

Pennsylvania Dutch refers to immigrants and their descendants from 
(If you want to read about east of the areas click on the red link below.)
who settled in Pennsylvania originally but also emigrated to 
  • West Virginia 
  • and Ohio in the 17th & 18th centuries. 
Historically they have spoken the dialect of German known as Pennsylvania Dutch or Pennsylvania German (Deutsch) which also includes the Amish and the Mennonites. (I personally lived 5 miles from an Amish community and on Saturday mornings they would hitch up the horses & buggies & go to town to shop for the week.)


Very important in the cooking were
  • Noodles can be served with anything: (flat noodles, spaetzle noodles, etc.)
    • in soups
    • as a side dish with any fish, beef or fowl
    • as an appetizer
    • as a dessert with a rich sweet sauce


  


  


  • They had many soup recipes.  Soup making was considered an art:  hot & cold soups, fruit soups, light broths, chowder soups and more!!


  


  


LINK for Taste of Home German Soups with photos & VIDEOS

Chow-Chow is a German relish made with green tomatoes and more!!  I love it!  You can make it sweet, hot and mild.  We like semi-hot and not sweet.  You can put it on beans or hot dogs or anything you like relish on.  This photo below is not mine but this is how ours looks.   We haven't made ours this year yet. 





Root Beer and Birch Beer (not Beer beer - that's a different pack of Germans)

  



  


Photos below part of the faspa or Sunday Dinner for day of rest.  Prepared on Saturday. 
Meats, cheeses, zweibach rolls, mennonite sausage, 

  

Two photos above from Rhonda Nickel of Mennonite Foods
She has a nice presence on Pinterest.  Here is a link:





  



The Pa Dutch, Mennonites, Amish liked sponge cake. I think they would have liked this one!!



Pies were a big part of the Germanic ethnic cuisine in America. 


Homemade whoopie pies

  



ALSACE - FRENCH OR GERMAN?

Photos of Colmar, Germany

  


  


  




I have been to Alsace (Colmar and Strasbourg, etc) and believe it is part of my German heritage.  It is a mixed province along with Lorraine which got conquered several times by the Germans and then given back to the French.  Legally part of France it is VERY MULTICULTURED because of the many occupations by the Germans.  The menus are in both languages; you can hear both languages being spoken and the food is a mixture of French and German.  You must check out this webpage I found below and you will see what I mean:


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by Sunny Anderson - Cooking for Real


Recipes in This Episode

Honey Glazed Carrots  VIDEO


Hunter's Veal Chop with Southern Cheese Grits: Jaegerschnitzel with Southern Cheese Grits


Baked Apple with Crisp Topping





SOUTHWESTERN GERMANY included:
Bavaria
Baden-Wurttemburg
Rhineland-Palatinate
Saarland

LINK TO GERMAN FOODS 
 Southwestern links near top (foods also shared with Austria and Switzerland)


  


  



Northern Switzerland
North eastern Switzerland and Liechtenstein
Zurich area
Basel Area (was married in Basel, Switzerland)

Photos of areas above:

  


  
  


  


  

Recipes from the German part of Switzerland


Älplermagronen: (Alpine herdsman's macaroni) is a frugal all-in-one dish making use of the ingredients the herdsmen had at hand in their alpine cottages: macaroni, potatoes, onions, small pieces of bacon, and melted cheese. Traditionally Älplermagronen is served with applesauce instead of vegetables or salad.



  • Cut meat, Zurich style (Zürcher Geschnetzeltes): This dish is often served with Rösti.
  • Emmental Apple Rösti: This used to be a very popular meal, since the ingredients were usually at hand and the preparation is very simple. The recipe comes from the Emmental ("Emmen valley") in Canton Bern, the home of the famous Emmentaler cheese.

  • Fotzel slices: Nobody really knows how this dish got its name. Literally, "fotzel" means a torn-off scrap of paper, but in Basel dialect it means a suspicious individual. Stale bread can be used to make fotzel slices, which made it an ideal recipe for homemakers accustomed to never throwing bread away.
  • LINK TO SWISS FRENCH TOAST - BASEL



  • Riz Casimir is a preparation of rice with curry sauce and minced pork blended with tropical fruits: pineapple, banana and cherries, sometimes with currant grape. It was first served in 1952 by the international chain of hotel and resorts.
  • LINK TO RIZ CASIMIR from recipes365 and photo step by step

  • Rösti: This simple dish, similar to hash browns, is traditionally regarded as a Swiss German favorite. It has given its name to the "Rösti ditch", the imaginary line of cultural demarcation between the German and French regions of Switzerland. However, it is also eaten by the French-speaking Swiss.
  • LINK TO CHEESE ROSTI from All Recipes - Basel