Friday, March 7, 2014

The PA Melting Pot - Part 5 Eastern Europeans - Part 1 - Ukrainian, Moldavian, Belarusian - I REPOST THIS AGAIN IN HONOR OF THE UKRAINIANS WHO CONTINUE TO PROTEST AGAINST RUSSIAN INFLUENCE. SEE LINKS IN ARTICLE.

Today is March 7, 2014 & we have 6-7 inches of snow at my house in North Carolina.

UPDATE 10:25 AM EST
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/ukraine/

GREAT ARTICLE IN PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE

http://www.post-gazette.com/local/region/2014/03/07/Ukrainians-here-yearn-for-democracy-but-worry-about-safety-stability/stories/201403070086#ixzz2vI3qlyds


Older news in February

http://www.heraldstandard.com/news/world/europe/ukraine-s-leader-offers-concessions-in-kiev-crisis/article_1483a065-4163-514e-8eab-1d431565dfa9.html

Updated Link - February 11 2014
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/ukraine/10598198/Fire-and-fury-at-Ukraine-protests.html


Click on LINKS above to see what is going on in the UKRAINE TODAY!!

MORE RECENT PHOTOS OF THE CONTINUING PROTESTS IN THE UKRAINE BELOW

January 20 and January 24, 2013


  

  

  

  

  

  

  



FROM THE COLUMN WRITTEN FOR THE UNIONTOWN HERALD-STANDARD IN UNIONTOWN PA with additons of photos, links, recipe links and MORE!!

Part 5 -1 – EASTERN EUROPEANS:  UKRAINIAN, MOLDOVIAN AND BELARUSIAN

The PA Melting Pot:  A look at the evolution of food in southwestern Pennsylvania – 5 - 
Eastern Europeans Part 1

In many European countries the cross-over of cultures, customs and cuisines have enveloped them causing the evolution today’s cuisines.  As mentioned in my previous Russian Republic column many of these countries were their own entities until the Russians amassed them under USSR domination until 1991 when the breakup of this mega-power occurred.  Despite the USSR oppression the individual cultures, customs and cuisines survived and now strive today.  

Commonalities/differences in cuisines exist in the US:  barbecues, chilis, soups/chowders, relishes, sourdough/yeast breads/muffins/biscuits and wieners/sausages, meatloaves, hamburgers and pastas are prepared differently depending upon the US area.   

As in the US similarities/differences exist in Eastern European cuisine depending upon the area.  As people traveled in both worlds these travels caused transformations in recipes, preparations and ingredients:   Pierogies, Chicken Kiev, Beef Stroganoff, stuffed cabbage, blini, blintzes … are in some manner foods of most European cuisines.  I will not stress the similarities and, not in many cases, list duplicate foods but will try to show off the different foods that distinguish each country.

Today I have grouped three European countries by proximity:  the Ukraine, Moldova and Belarus.  There are no actual numbers for immigrants from each country as US immigration lumped them together as all Russians. But be sure if asked these immigrants/descendants know which individual country they came from.  For Example:  A Ukrainian will say The Ukraine not Russia and rightfully so!!

UKRAINIAN
Photos of Flag and Country
(See beneath for list of foods, food links and other links)

      

    

    

    

    

    

    

            



Ukrainian Foods were influenced by Russian, Polish, Romanian, German, Austrian, Turkish, Polish and Hungarian cuisine, but the share of old Slavic traditions is still the most important:  

**Some of the more popular and unusual Ukrainian foods are:
DRINKS:  Rhubarb Kompot (drink), beer, mead, vodka, Kvass (fermented rye bread drink), local wine
APPETIZERS, SALADS, MAIN COURSES & AND DESSERTS:  Chicken Kiev (chicken meat with herb butter …), varied sausages, Quark (fresh cheese), potatoes fried with garlic and caraway seeds, stuffed dumplings, Kholodets (jellied meats), beet relish, Mannaya Kasha (semolina porridge), cabbage rolls in sour cream sauce, Borscht (beetroot soup),   Khrustyky (Ukrainian crispy pastry), beet salad with prunes and walnuts, Varenyky (fresh cheese dumplings) and sour cherry dumplings.

    

    

    

    

    

    

UKRAINIAN LINKS

UKRAINE             http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ukraine
RECIPE LINKS      
One:                       http://www.enjoyyourcooking.com/tag/ukrainian
Two:                       http://www.ukrainianclassickitchen.ca/index.php

MOLDAVIAN
Photos of Flag and Country
(See beneath for list of foods, food links and other links)


    

    

    

    

    

    

    

  

Moldovian cuisine was influenced by the Ukrainians, Russians, Greeks, Jews, Germans and others.)

**Some of the more popular and unusual Moldovian foods are: 
DRINKS:  Fruit juice, beer, divin (brandy), Moldov ian wines and vodka
APPETIZERS, SALADS, MAIN COURSES & AND DESSERTS:  ciorba (appetizers), Mamaliga (cornmeal mush), potato and meat pudding, sour soup with meatballs, fisherman’s soup, Moldovan lentil soup, Coltunasi (stuffed dumplings with meat),  Branza  (brined cheese), Ghiveci (mutton stew), Sarmal  (stuffed cabbage), Moldovan black butter (made with olives), Moldovian stuffed eggs, Vareniki (fruit dumplings), and Peltea (quince jelly).

    

    

    

    

MOLDOVIAN LINKS

MOLDAVA           http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moldova
CUISINE                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moldovan_cuisine
RECIPE LINKS      
One:                       http://recipes.moldova.org/
Two:                       http://recipes.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Moldovan_Recipes

BELARUSIAN
Photos of Flag and Country
(See beneath for list of foods, food links and other links)

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

    

          


NOTE: According to Russian historian William Pochlyobkin, who wrote more then 50 books on history of culinary arts of different parts of Soviet Union, Belarusian cuisine came into existence only at the end of 19th century. Before 19th century there were a variety of cuisines and the difference was profound. Food of peasants, similar to other Slavic cuisines (such as Russian and Ukrainian) which roots went as far as 9th century had nothing in common with food of the ruling class which took after Polish and to some extent German cuisines. By the end of 19th century Belarusian cuisine was born by blending those two together. 


**Some of the more popular and unusual Belarusian foods are:
DRINKS:  Kvass (fermented rye bread drink), Kompot (fruit drink), Krambambula (diluted vodka with spices), mead, Miaducha (honey drink) and vodka.
APPETIZERS, SALADS, MAIN COURSES & AND DESSERTS:  Borsc (borscht), Zrazy (stuffed chopped beef), Macanka (meat gravy used like a dip), Draniki (potato pancakes), sour rye bread, Blini (pancakes), Kapusta (cabbage soup), Yushka with meat (fish soup with meat), stuffed eggs, cottage cheese sticks, Mienski (sauerkraut, potatoes, onion & mushroom soup), Zacarika with milk (tiny dumplings), Niamiha Cutlet  (pork), Harbuz with noodles (pumpkin), cranberry Kiesel (pastry) and stewed dried fruits with honey.  

     

    

     

   

  






BELARUSIAN LINKS

BELARUS             http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belarus
CUISINE                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belarusian_cuisine
RECIPE LINKS:  
One:                        http://www.belarus.by/en/about-belarus/cuisine
Two:                        http://knihi.com/none/Belarusian_cuisine-en.html

Three:                     http://recipes.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Belarusian_Recipes
TRAVEL:               http://www.travelnotes.org/Europe/belarus.htm


The next column will deal with Part 6 - Macedonians:  1 - Greeks - To be published on 10/24/2013




No comments:

Post a Comment